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In his hour-and-a-half interview for the American Comedy Archives at Emerson College, Lewis Black talks about his early interest in drama, and what made him decide to be a comedian. He speaks of developing his routine, and crafting his comedic persona that 'The Daily Show' audiences would eventually come to know. Black speaks of anger in comedy, as well as politics, and if comedy can be learned. He discusses the business of show business, and the importance of cultivating longevity in a comedy career. Bill Dana and Jenni Matz conducted the interview on October 19, 2005 in New York, NY. Additional topics covered include: Fame and Celebrity, Pop Culture, Television Industry, and Talk Shows. An additional show mentioned during the interview is 'The Steve Allen Show' (1956-61).

2005-10-19

In his hour-and-a-half interview for the American Comedy Archives at Emerson College, Lewis Black talks about his early interest in drama, and what made him decide to be a comedian. He speaks of developing his routine, and crafting his comedic persona that 'The Daily Show' audiences would eventually come to know. Black speaks of anger in comedy, as well as politics, and if comedy can be learned. He discusses the business of show business, and the importance of cultivating longevity in a comedy career. Bill Dana and Jenni Matz conducted the interview on October 19, 2005 in New York, NY. Additional topics covered include: Fame and Celebrity, Pop Culture, Television Industry, and Talk Shows. An additional show mentioned during the interview is 'The Steve Allen Show' (1956-61).

2005-10-19

In his hour-and-a-half interview for the American Comedy Archives at Emerson College, Lewis Black talks about his early interest in drama, and what made him decide to be a comedian. He speaks of developing his routine, and crafting his comedic persona that 'The Daily Show' audiences would eventually come to know. Black speaks of anger in comedy, as well as politics, and if comedy can be learned. He discusses the business of show business, and the importance of cultivating longevity in a comedy career. Bill Dana and Jenni Matz conducted the interview on October 19, 2005 in New York, NY. Additional topics covered include: Fame and Celebrity, Pop Culture, Television Industry, and Talk Shows. An additional show mentioned during the interview is 'The Steve Allen Show' (1956-61).

2005-10-19

In his one-hour interview for the American Comedy Archives at Emerson College, "Weird Al" Yankovic talks about his early years, and his first break, getting his music played on the "Dr. Demento" radio show. He describes the types of parodies he does, and how he tends to stay away from satire and political humor. He recalls his television show, 'AL TV,' and his experiences interviewing guests like Eminem. Yankovic speaks of dealing with fame and celebrity, and what his fan base expects of him. He discusses his 'White & Nerdy' music video, which featured Donny Osmond, as well as his cult classic feature film 'UHF.' He speaks of the challenges of being a comedian in the music industry, and considers the question "Was it worth it?" Bill Dana and Jenni Matz conducted the interview on February 10, 2007 in Los Angeles, CA. Additional topics covered include: Advice, Creative Influences and Inspiration, Fame and Celebrity, Pivotal Career Moments, Pop culture, Television Industry, Comedy Series, and Talk Shows. An additional show mentioned during the interview is 'Tomorrow.'

2007-02-10

In his one-hour interview for the American Comedy Archives at Emerson College, "Weird Al" Yankovic talks about his early years, and his first break, getting his music played on the "Dr. Demento" radio show. He describes the types of parodies he does, and how he tends to stay away from satire and political humor. He recalls his television show, 'AL TV,' and his experiences interviewing guests like Eminem. Yankovic speaks of dealing with fame and celebrity, and what his fan base expects of him. He discusses his 'White & Nerdy' music video, which featured Donny Osmond, as well as his cult classic feature film 'UHF.' He speaks of the challenges of being a comedian in the music industry, and considers the question "Was it worth it?" Bill Dana and Jenni Matz conducted the interview on February 10, 2007 in Los Angeles, CA. Additional topics covered include: Advice, Creative Influences and Inspiration, Fame and Celebrity, Pivotal Career Moments, Pop culture, Television Industry, Comedy Series, and Talk Shows. An additional show mentioned during the interview is 'Tomorrow.'

2007-02-10

In his one-hour interview for the American Comedy Archives at Emerson College, "Weird Al" Yankovic talks about his early years, and his first break, getting his music played on the "Dr. Demento" radio show. He describes the types of parodies he does, and how he tends to stay away from satire and political humor. He recalls his television show, 'AL TV,' and his experiences interviewing guests like Eminem. Yankovic speaks of dealing with fame and celebrity, and what his fan base expects of him. He discusses his 'White & Nerdy' music video, which featured Donny Osmond, as well as his cult classic feature film 'UHF.' He speaks of the challenges of being a comedian in the music industry, and considers the question "Was it worth it?" Bill Dana and Jenni Matz conducted the interview on February 10, 2007 in Los Angeles, CA. Additional topics covered include: Advice, Creative Influences and Inspiration, Fame and Celebrity, Pivotal Career Moments, Pop culture, Television Industry, Comedy Series, and Talk Shows. An additional show mentioned during the interview is 'Tomorrow.'

2007-02-10

In his forty-five minute interview for the American Comedy Archives at Emerson College, Hugh Hefner (1926-2017) talks about his connection to humor, and his friendships with comedians like Lenny Bruce and Don Adams. He describes having comedians on his early talk show 'Playboy’s Penthouse,' as well as breaking ground by having African-American comedian Dick Gregory perform at his clubs. He discusses the humor of "Playboy" magazine, and early contributors like Jules Feiffer. He speaks of the then-current state of censorship in media, and also touches on humor and repression, as well as fame and celebrity. Bill Dana and Jenni Matz conducted the interview on March 9, 2005 in Los Angeles, CA. Additional topics covered include: Civil Rights Movement, Historic Events and Social Change, Television Industry, and Talk Shows.

2005-03-09

In his forty-five minute interview for the American Comedy Archives at Emerson College, Hugh Hefner (1926-2017) talks about his connection to humor, and his friendships with comedians like Lenny Bruce and Don Adams. He describes having comedians on his early talk show 'Playboy’s Penthouse,' as well as breaking ground by having African-American comedian Dick Gregory perform at his clubs. He discusses the humor of "Playboy" magazine, and early contributors like Jules Feiffer. He speaks of the then-current state of censorship in media, and also touches on humor and repression, as well as fame and celebrity. Bill Dana and Jenni Matz conducted the interview on March 9, 2005 in Los Angeles, CA. Additional topics covered include: Civil Rights Movement, Historic Events and Social Change, Television Industry, and Talk Shows.

2005-03-09

In his forty-five minute interview for the American Comedy Archives at Emerson College, Hugh Hefner (1926-2017) talks about his connection to humor, and his friendships with comedians like Lenny Bruce and Don Adams. He describes having comedians on his early talk show 'Playboy’s Penthouse,' as well as breaking ground by having African-American comedian Dick Gregory perform at his clubs. He discusses the humor of "Playboy" magazine, and early contributors like Jules Feiffer. He speaks of the then-current state of censorship in media, and also touches on humor and repression, as well as fame and celebrity. Bill Dana and Jenni Matz conducted the interview on March 9, 2005 in Los Angeles, CA. Additional topics covered include: Civil Rights Movement, Historic Events and Social Change, Television Industry, and Talk Shows.

2005-03-09

In his two-hour interview for the American Comedy Archives at Emerson College, Paul Rodriguez speaks of his early life, and of using comedy and his ability to make people laugh to get though his childhood. He talks about deciding to pursue a career in stand-up comedy, and of his beginning at the Comedy Store in Westwood where he met and was mentored by Richard Pryor. He recalls his first appearance on 'The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson,' where Carson afforded him the rare honor of calling him over to his couch after his routine, and talks about being discovered by Norman Lear while out doing his act. Rodriguez discusses in-depth his Lear-produced sitcom 'a.k.a. Pablo,' which was short-lived due to negative reaction from the Mexican-American community to what they felt was a stereotypical portrayal. He outlines attempting to revive his career after the show’s cancellation, and details dealing with celebrity, and continuing to make a living doing stand-up over 30 years on. Bill Dana and Jenni Matz conducted the interview on February 19, 2007 in Hollywood, CA. Additional topics covered include: Advice, Creative Influences and Inspiration, Diversity in Television, Fame and Celebrity, Historic Events and Social Change, Minorities, Pivotal Career Moments, Television Industry, and Comedy Series.

2007-02-19

In his two-hour interview for the American Comedy Archives at Emerson College, Paul Rodriguez speaks of his early life, and of using comedy and his ability to make people laugh to get though his childhood. He talks about deciding to pursue a career in stand-up comedy, and of his beginning at the Comedy Store in Westwood where he met and was mentored by Richard Pryor. He recalls his first appearance on 'The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson,' where Carson afforded him the rare honor of calling him over to his couch after his routine, and talks about being discovered by Norman Lear while out doing his act. Rodriguez discusses in-depth his Lear-produced sitcom 'a.k.a. Pablo,' which was short-lived due to negative reaction from the Mexican-American community to what they felt was a stereotypical portrayal. He outlines attempting to revive his career after the show’s cancellation, and details dealing with celebrity, and continuing to make a living doing stand-up over 30 years on. Bill Dana and Jenni Matz conducted the interview on February 19, 2007 in Hollywood, CA. Additional topics covered include: Advice, Creative Influences and Inspiration, Diversity in Television, Fame and Celebrity, Historic Events and Social Change, Minorities, Pivotal Career Moments, Television Industry, and Comedy Series.

2007-02-19

In his two-hour interview for the American Comedy Archives at Emerson College, Paul Rodriguez speaks of his early life, and of using comedy and his ability to make people laugh to get though his childhood. He talks about deciding to pursue a career in stand-up comedy, and of his beginning at the Comedy Store in Westwood where he met and was mentored by Richard Pryor. He recalls his first appearance on 'The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson,' where Carson afforded him the rare honor of calling him over to his couch after his routine, and talks about being discovered by Norman Lear while out doing his act. Rodriguez discusses in-depth his Lear-produced sitcom 'a.k.a. Pablo,' which was short-lived due to negative reaction from the Mexican-American community to what they felt was a stereotypical portrayal. He outlines attempting to revive his career after the show’s cancellation, and details dealing with celebrity, and continuing to make a living doing stand-up over 30 years on. Bill Dana and Jenni Matz conducted the interview on February 19, 2007 in Hollywood, CA. Additional topics covered include: Advice, Creative Influences and Inspiration, Diversity in Television, Fame and Celebrity, Historic Events and Social Change, Minorities, Pivotal Career Moments, Television Industry, and Comedy Series.

2007-02-19

In part two of his two-part interview for the American Comedy Archives, Bill Dana (1924-2017) talks about comedians learning to deal with their environment and audiences. He describes first learning how to make people laugh, and later using comedy to disarm. He discusses evolving standards for subject matter and language in comedy, and his controversial character "Jose Jimenez" from 'The Bill Dana Show. 'Dana speaks of working with Norman Lear on writing the classic 'All in the Family' episode "Sammy’s Visit," featuring Sammy Davis, Jr., and outlines his own guest shot on 'The Golden Girls.' He sums up by talking about the need for performers to pay their dues, and he answers the question, "Was it worth it?" Jenni Matz conducted part two of the interview on June 3, 2005 in Los Angeles, CA. Additional topics covered include: Fame and Celebrity, Pop Culture, Television Industry, Comedy Series, and Talk Shows.

2005-06-03

In part two of his two-part interview for the American Comedy Archives, Bill Dana (1924-2017) talks about comedians learning to deal with their environment and audiences. He describes first learning how to make people laugh, and later using comedy to disarm. He discusses evolving standards for subject matter and language in comedy, and his controversial character "Jose Jimenez" from 'The Bill Dana Show. 'Dana speaks of working with Norman Lear on writing the classic 'All in the Family' episode "Sammy’s Visit," featuring Sammy Davis, Jr., and outlines his own guest shot on 'The Golden Girls.' He sums up by talking about the need for performers to pay their dues, and he answers the question, "Was it worth it?" Jenni Matz conducted part two of the interview on June 3, 2005 in Los Angeles, CA. Additional topics covered include: Fame and Celebrity, Pop Culture, Television Industry, Comedy Series, and Talk Shows.

2005-06-03

In part two of his two-part interview for the American Comedy Archives, Bill Dana (1924-2017) talks about comedians learning to deal with their environment and audiences. He describes first learning how to make people laugh, and later using comedy to disarm. He discusses evolving standards for subject matter and language in comedy, and his controversial character "Jose Jimenez" from 'The Bill Dana Show. 'Dana speaks of working with Norman Lear on writing the classic 'All in the Family' episode "Sammy’s Visit," featuring Sammy Davis, Jr., and outlines his own guest shot on 'The Golden Girls.' He sums up by talking about the need for performers to pay their dues, and he answers the question, "Was it worth it?" Jenni Matz conducted part two of the interview on June 3, 2005 in Los Angeles, CA. Additional topics covered include: Fame and Celebrity, Pop Culture, Television Industry, Comedy Series, and Talk Shows.

2005-06-03

In part one of his two-part interview for the American Comedy Archives at Emerson College, Bill Dana (1924-2017) discusses the use of humor as a survival tool. He talks about his time at Emerson College, and early comedy partner Gene Wood. He recalls his time on 'The Steve Allen Show,' as well as creating his most famous character, "Jose Jimenez." He details using "Jose" as the main character for 'The Bill Dana Show,' and his eventual decision to kill him off due to cultural sensitivity concerns. He recounts writing the famous 'All in the Family' episode "Sammy Visit," featuring Sammy Davis, Jr., and addresses comedy’s role in society. Jenni Matz conducted part one of the interview on February 21, 2005 at the Cutler Majestic Theater at Emerson College in Boston, MA. Additional topics covered include: Bloopers, Censorship/Standards & Practices, Fame and Celebrity, Pop Culture, Television Industry, Comedy Series, and Talk Shows.

2005-02-21

In part one of his two-part interview for the American Comedy Archives at Emerson College, Bill Dana (1924-2017) discusses the use of humor as a survival tool. He talks about his time at Emerson College, and early comedy partner Gene Wood. He recalls his time on 'The Steve Allen Show,' as well as creating his most famous character, "Jose Jimenez." He details using "Jose" as the main character for 'The Bill Dana Show,' and his eventual decision to kill him off due to cultural sensitivity concerns. He recounts writing the famous 'All in the Family' episode "Sammy Visit," featuring Sammy Davis, Jr., and addresses comedy’s role in society. Jenni Matz conducted part one of the interview on February 21, 2005 at the Cutler Majestic Theater at Emerson College in Boston, MA. Additional topics covered include: Bloopers, Censorship/Standards & Practices, Fame and Celebrity, Pop Culture, Television Industry, Comedy Series, and Talk Shows.

2005-02-21

In part one of his two-part interview for the American Comedy Archives at Emerson College, Bill Dana (1924-2017) discusses the use of humor as a survival tool. He talks about his time at Emerson College, and early comedy partner Gene Wood. He recalls his time on 'The Steve Allen Show,' as well as creating his most famous character, "Jose Jimenez." He details using "Jose" as the main character for 'The Bill Dana Show,' and his eventual decision to kill him off due to cultural sensitivity concerns. He recounts writing the famous 'All in the Family' episode "Sammy Visit," featuring Sammy Davis, Jr., and addresses comedy’s role in society. Jenni Matz conducted part one of the interview on February 21, 2005 at the Cutler Majestic Theater at Emerson College in Boston, MA. Additional topics covered include: Bloopers, Censorship/Standards & Practices, Fame and Celebrity, Pop Culture, Television Industry, Comedy Series, and Talk Shows.

2005-02-21

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