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Date

1986-02

In her one-hour interview for the American Comedy Archives at Emerson College, Rose Marie (1923-2017) talks about entering show business at age three, and soon after becoming a smash hit as "Baby Rose Marie," selling out the Capital Theater in New York, and with her own NBC radio show. She describes her long friendship and professional association with Milton Berle, as well as her husband Buddy Guy, a trumpet player in Kay Kyser’s band. She recounts playing Las Vegas, and her professional and personal association with mobsters like Bugsy Siegel and Al Capone. She discusses playing "Sally Rogers" on 'The Dick Van Dyke Show,' and working with Van Dyke, the cast, and producer Sheldon Leonard. She speaks of playing "Myrna Gibbons" for five years on 'The Doris Day Show,' and her subsequent stage show "4 Girls 4" with Helen O’Connell, Rosemary Clooney, and Margaret Whiting. She details having dealt with the business end of show business, and concludes with a summary of her career. Bill Dana and Jenni Matz conducted the interview on January 24, 2006 in Van Nuys, CA. Additional topics covered include: Advice, Television Industry, Child Labor Laws, and Comedy Series. An additional show mentioned during the interview is 'The Doris Day Show.'

2006-01-24

In her one-hour interview for the American Comedy Archives at Emerson College, Rose Marie (1923-2017) talks about entering show business at age three, and soon after becoming a smash hit as "Baby Rose Marie," selling out the Capital Theater in New York, and with her own NBC radio show. She describes her long friendship and professional association with Milton Berle, as well as her husband Buddy Guy, a trumpet player in Kay Kyser’s band. She recounts playing Las Vegas, and her professional and personal association with mobsters like Bugsy Siegel and Al Capone. She discusses playing "Sally Rogers" on 'The Dick Van Dyke Show,' and working with Van Dyke, the cast, and producer Sheldon Leonard. She speaks of playing "Myrna Gibbons" for five years on 'The Doris Day Show,' and her subsequent stage show "4 Girls 4" with Helen O’Connell, Rosemary Clooney, and Margaret Whiting. She details having dealt with the business end of show business, and concludes with a summary of her career. Bill Dana and Jenni Matz conducted the interview on January 24, 2006 in Van Nuys, CA. Additional topics covered include: Advice, Television Industry, Child Labor Laws, and Comedy Series. An additional show mentioned during the interview is 'The Doris Day Show.'

2006-01-24

In her one-hour interview for the American Comedy Archives at Emerson College, Rose Marie (1923-2017) talks about entering show business at age three, and soon after becoming a smash hit as "Baby Rose Marie," selling out the Capital Theater in New York, and with her own NBC radio show. She describes her long friendship and professional association with Milton Berle, as well as her husband Buddy Guy, a trumpet player in Kay Kyser’s band. She recounts playing Las Vegas, and her professional and personal association with mobsters like Bugsy Siegel and Al Capone. She discusses playing "Sally Rogers" on 'The Dick Van Dyke Show,' and working with Van Dyke, the cast, and producer Sheldon Leonard. She speaks of playing "Myrna Gibbons" for five years on 'The Doris Day Show,' and her subsequent stage show "4 Girls 4" with Helen O’Connell, Rosemary Clooney, and Margaret Whiting. She details having dealt with the business end of show business, and concludes with a summary of her career. Bill Dana and Jenni Matz conducted the interview on January 24, 2006 in Van Nuys, CA. Additional topics covered include: Advice, Television Industry, Child Labor Laws, and Comedy Series. An additional show mentioned during the interview is 'The Doris Day Show.'

2006-01-24

The American Comedy Archives Oral Histories consists of audiovisual interviews conducted by comedian Bill Dana, archivist/historian Jenni Matz, comedian Eddie Brill, archivist/historian Robert Fleming, and television producer/professor Dan Pasternack with comedians, directors, writers, producers, agents, and experts on comedy. Oral history interviews were conducted with Bea Arthur, Ed Begley, Jr., Shelley Berman, Lewis Black, Kevin Bright, Eddie Brill, Jack Carter, Dick Cavett, Tim Conway, Irwin Corey, Norm Crosby, Billy Crystal, Bill Dana, Sam Denoff, Vin DiBona, Phyllis Diller, Diane English, Barbara Feldon, Budd Friedman, Larry Gelbart, Shecky Greene, Dick Gregory, Charles Grodin, Pat Harrington, Jr., Hugh Hefner, Buck Henry, Doug Herzog, Arte Johnson, Austin "Rocky" Kalish, Irma Kalish, Hal Kanter, Don Knotts, Norman Lear, Rose Marie, Peter Marshall, Dick Martin, Jamie Masada, Jackie Mason, Chuck McCann, Jayne Meadows, Carlos Mencia, Howard Murray, Jan Murray, Bob Newhart, Louis Nye, Gary Owens, Janis Paige, Bill Persky, Tom Poston, Carl Reiner, Jack Riley, Tony Roberts, Paul Rodriguez, Andy Rooney, Jay Sandrich, George Schlatter, George Shapiro, Leonard Stern, Howard Storm, Dick Van Dyke, Dick Van Patten, Betty White, Fred Willard, Henry Winkler, Jonathan Winters, Steven Wright, and "Weird Al" Yankovic. The bulk of the interviews were originally recorded on DVcam tapes from February 2005 through May 2007 and duplicated at Emerson College. Some of the oral histories were done in conjunction with the American Television Foundation. In addition to the video oral histories there are transcripts for certain interviews.

2005-02-21 - 2019-06-10

In his one-hour interview for the American Comedy Archives at Emerson College, "Weird Al" Yankovic talks about his early years, and his first break, getting his music played on the "Dr. Demento" radio show. He describes the types of parodies he does, and how he tends to stay away from satire and political humor. He recalls his television show, 'AL TV,' and his experiences interviewing guests like Eminem. Yankovic speaks of dealing with fame and celebrity, and what his fan base expects of him. He discusses his 'White & Nerdy' music video, which featured Donny Osmond, as well as his cult classic feature film 'UHF.' He speaks of the challenges of being a comedian in the music industry, and considers the question "Was it worth it?" Bill Dana and Jenni Matz conducted the interview on February 10, 2007 in Los Angeles, CA. Additional topics covered include: Advice, Creative Influences and Inspiration, Fame and Celebrity, Pivotal Career Moments, Pop culture, Television Industry, Comedy Series, and Talk Shows. An additional show mentioned during the interview is 'Tomorrow.'

2007-02-10

In his one-hour interview for the American Comedy Archives at Emerson College, "Weird Al" Yankovic talks about his early years, and his first break, getting his music played on the "Dr. Demento" radio show. He describes the types of parodies he does, and how he tends to stay away from satire and political humor. He recalls his television show, 'AL TV,' and his experiences interviewing guests like Eminem. Yankovic speaks of dealing with fame and celebrity, and what his fan base expects of him. He discusses his 'White & Nerdy' music video, which featured Donny Osmond, as well as his cult classic feature film 'UHF.' He speaks of the challenges of being a comedian in the music industry, and considers the question "Was it worth it?" Bill Dana and Jenni Matz conducted the interview on February 10, 2007 in Los Angeles, CA. Additional topics covered include: Advice, Creative Influences and Inspiration, Fame and Celebrity, Pivotal Career Moments, Pop culture, Television Industry, Comedy Series, and Talk Shows. An additional show mentioned during the interview is 'Tomorrow.'

2007-02-10

In his one-hour interview for the American Comedy Archives at Emerson College, "Weird Al" Yankovic talks about his early years, and his first break, getting his music played on the "Dr. Demento" radio show. He describes the types of parodies he does, and how he tends to stay away from satire and political humor. He recalls his television show, 'AL TV,' and his experiences interviewing guests like Eminem. Yankovic speaks of dealing with fame and celebrity, and what his fan base expects of him. He discusses his 'White & Nerdy' music video, which featured Donny Osmond, as well as his cult classic feature film 'UHF.' He speaks of the challenges of being a comedian in the music industry, and considers the question "Was it worth it?" Bill Dana and Jenni Matz conducted the interview on February 10, 2007 in Los Angeles, CA. Additional topics covered include: Advice, Creative Influences and Inspiration, Fame and Celebrity, Pivotal Career Moments, Pop culture, Television Industry, Comedy Series, and Talk Shows. An additional show mentioned during the interview is 'Tomorrow.'

2007-02-10

Mario standing on a circular staircase.

1986-01

Mario holding a hanging plant on a balcony.

1986-01

Mario standing in front of large artwork of a Coca Cola can. Mario saluting with serious expression.

1986-01

Mario standing in front of posted dated 1981 with Rolling Stones "tongue and lip" logo. Mario sticking his tongue out, with slumped shoulders.

1986-01

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